Film School Reject, $50M in Marketing-Sourced Revenue & Starting a New B2B SaaS – Insights from Pete Larkin

In an insightful episode of the podcast, we sit down with Pete Larkin, a remarkable figure in the world of marketing and business. As a father of four, an outdoor adventure enthusiast, co-founder of Parlay, and chapter president for the marketing chapter of Silicon Slopes, Pete’s journey is nothing short of inspiring.

From Film to Marketing: A Path Shaped by Failure

Pete’s journey into marketing wasn’t straightforward. Originally aspiring to be in the film industry, Pete faced rejection from BYU’s film school. This setback, though initially disheartening, redirected him towards advertising and, eventually, marketing. He shares a pivotal moment when he realized the importance of being directly linked to a company’s revenue stream. This realization propelled him towards a more marketing-focused career path, where he could demonstrate tangible impact on business growth.

Building a Career in Marketing

Pete’s career in marketing began with a role at Fieldstone Homes. Here, he learned the ropes of marketing by diving into various facets like SEO, website building, and content creation. His stint at Fieldstone was followed by roles in different companies, including agency experience, which he found wasn’t his forte. He then moved on to Anglepoint, where he significantly contributed to the company’s growth, primarily through strategic marketing efforts.

The Genesis of Parlay

The idea for Parlay, a unique B2B SaaS company, stemmed from a common pain point Pete and his brother experienced: the rigid payment terms in software procurement. They realized that many companies face challenges with annual payment terms, which can be a significant cash flow hurdle. Parlay was born out of the need to offer more flexible, monthly payment options for software contracts, thereby benefiting both buyers and sellers in the SaaS space.

Giving Back: Teaching and Community Involvement

Pete’s passion for marketing extends beyond his professional endeavors. He has been actively involved in teaching and mentoring aspiring marketers. His involvement with Silicon Slopes as the chapter president for marketing is a testament to his commitment to giving back to the community. He emphasizes the value of specialization in marketing and advises aspiring marketers to focus on a particular skill before expanding their expertise.

Conclusion

Pete Larkin’s journey through the realms of film, marketing, and entrepreneurship is a powerful narrative of resilience, adaptability, and innovation. His experiences offer valuable insights for anyone looking to navigate the ever-evolving landscape of business and marketing.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/peteralarkin/

https://www.linkedin.com/company/silicon-slopes-marketing-chapter/

https://paywithparlay.com/

Podcast Transcript

0:00

[Music] well today we have Pete Lin in the house

0:08

we’re excited to talk to you today Pete you’re a you’re father of four you’re like Outdoor Adventure guy from what I

0:14

can tell and you’re the co-founder at parlay and you’re also the chapter

0:20

president for the marketing chapter of silk and slopes did I get all that right that’s right you know I think that was a

0:25

perfect order too order priority right there good I I tried like I I’m also father so like I’m you know my daughters

0:32

come first for sure you know so tell us a little bit about yourself and you know what you have going on right now yeah

0:39

I’m doing right now uh the main gig is aside being a father and a husband um

0:46

working on parlay building out this uh new company which is uh in short the buy

0:52

now pay later for the B2B SAS world uh working on building a community of

0:58

marketers here in in Utah with the silic and slopes um I head up the marketing

1:04

chapter and doing a lot of fun cool stuff there and just enjoying life man

1:11

just trying to live every day one you know one day at a time and just make the

1:16

most of it yeah that’s awesome man and like what what got you into marketing did you go to school for it where what

1:23

kind of started you on this path that you’re on now failure okay okay I love

1:29

it failure is what got me here um so I started out in the film World okay um I

1:35

was working at BYU independent study when I was in college are you BYU fan BYU fan BYU grad there go currently

1:42

doing an executive uh MBA at BYU awesome wait how do you get away with the Scruff

1:49

uh so classes every two weeks oh so this is like yesterday well I know you used

1:55

to I’ve seen like I’ve seen pictures of you you’ve had you used to have a pretty significant beer yeah yeah for those

2:00

that are unaware you can’t have a beard if you go to BYU right right so unless you have a beard card which is a real

2:06

thing it is a real thing uh or you can have mustache which boggles my mind can

2:12

look like a creeper one of those yeah one of those Antiquated rules like uh I

2:17

mean I’m a mustache fan but I do miss my beard I have Shavers remorse pretty much

2:23

every day sure so you’re getting a master’s currently yeah from BYU in what

2:28

again business yeah got which is great um really enjoying that but um yeah so I

2:35

was at by independent study and I was working uh on their film team their

2:40

video production team and we created all of the content uh for their courses and

2:46

I started getting freelance work and building reputation uh in the you know

2:52

video world this is when this is early on when dslrs they just just started

2:58

kind of coming out yeah um so I snagged one of those and just started doing a

3:04

lot of freelance video work and really quickly surprisingly fast and back then

3:10

we didn’t call it content marketing because that wasn’t a thing yet wasn’t a thing yet um and so we’re doing a lot of

3:15

You Know video content marketing for different different companies um I say we because the freelance work just was

3:23

booming and so I I hired a couple of my co-workers uh I left independent study to go full-time uh started a a video

3:32

production company and I called it animotion media okay I don’t know animotion media why did you call it that

3:39

I like I so I did some uh there there’s plenty of worse business names than that

3:45

but you don’t want to know what we were originally called yeah so uh it was I was doing some After Effects uh kind of

3:53

animations cool um that was part of it uh and then you know a lot of live

3:58

action stuff so uh it was it was growing quick and so I was like hey you know what I think I’m going to do I think I’m

4:04

going to go to film school um so I did the uh intro classes to to film at BYU

4:12

and then you have to apply and my business an emotion it was it was going great yeah um and especially for like

4:20

college job like just crushing it getting getting through school um which was fantastic and and I applied to film

4:27

school um to you know the ual program and got denied got rejected and I was a

4:33

little frustrated and to be honest I was a little surprised because I was like I’m already a good portfolio yeah yeah

4:40

got rejected even though you had a successful business that you were running which felt weird and so I just wanted a little bit of feedback so I

4:46

went to one of the the professors who makes those decisions and uh on who gets into the program and I said hey can I

4:53

can I just like figure out you know where did I go wrong um and I got some

4:58

uh tough feedback um but good feedback which he pretty much said like hey

5:05

um what you’re doing now with your business is what most of our grads do after they finish the program so you can

5:12

stay in our program and you know you can get the piece of paper or you can go to

5:18

a different program which we recommend and we want you to do uh and expand your

5:24

learning your education um and at the time it was hard because I was like that’s I want to do

5:30

yeah I want to learn more how about I tell you what I want to study and um and I’ll pay for it yeah um and so you know

5:41

that rejection like it felt weird and I was frustrated about it but then he he pushed me uh over into the BYU AD school

5:48

told me to go check it out so I went and checked out the ad program I applied there I got in and I loved it I loved

5:54

every bit of it um so I was still doing my uh my production company company uh

6:00

going to school doing uh in the ad program and one of my clients um as I

6:06

was about to graduate uh pretty much said hey I want you to come work with me full-time and I had a pretty cool job

6:13

offer in Chicago to work for a big Ad Agency and this is like okay stay in Utah yeah or go to Chicago and do this

6:21

big Ad Agency and to me it was like going to Chicago yeah um but he you know

6:28

came back to me and said I’m going to make make it worth your time he said I’m not going to be able to pay you as much as the the Ad Agency will um but your

6:37

quality of life and and just kind of what you value uh I think you’ll find better balance here um maybe better

6:45

Harmony and then he said I’m like I’m going to spend time with you you know dedicate time to mentorship and teaching

6:52

and uh I knew he was you know genuine about it and I really liked him so you

6:57

may know him uh he’s the CEO uh of bacon Hunter Sesso okay um and so

7:04

I I jumped in with him and this was uh working at deser book okay so it’s a pretty big like if you know deserted

7:10

book like very uh churchy uh religious focused uh Publishing Company um uh

7:18

versus going to Chicago at an ad agency very different yeah it’s pretty much the exact two opposites of what you

7:25

probably could do and what were you doing for Des book uh just video content video content uh so went

7:33

to work with um Hunter over there and just like he said he was you know true

7:38

to his word he spent um probably an hour almost daily with me just you know

7:44

teaching me would bring me into his office mentoring me and I learned a lot

7:50

there and had a great time he’s an incredible professional great friend um

7:55

really good at what he does he was the creative director over there um so enjoy my time over there uh and then and so

8:03

still pretty heavy and video video focus and kind of creative side of things um

8:10

and then after about 11 months uh desire book was going through some challenges and and there was a pretty significant

8:16

layoff I want to say it 20 maybe 30% Workforce uh reduction force and so

8:22

pretty much the entire creative Services Department was like gone and I’m 11

8:28

months in and I’m thinking in my head man like I just let go of this opportunity gave up Chicago to come here

8:35

and this is happening so you know I’m like looking at my life and I’m like dang like failure again like I didn’t

8:41

get into Film School uh which I wanted to do and at the time that really felt like a failure uh and then here I am

8:48

being laid off you know feeling like a failure and and I I stepped back and I

8:53

looked at who are all the people that stayed who are the people that didn’t get laid off and what is it about them

9:01

versus me on why I did get laid off they didn’t and it wasn’t so much about a

9:06

comparison of like uh you know person to person but but specifically role what was my role in the company and what was

9:14

the value that I was providing to the company versus these other people and I realized that pretty much the entire

9:20

marketing team um outside of creative Services stayed and these were the

9:26

people who were having direct impact on revenue and so that that was like a

9:31

click moment for me that if I want to protect myself from uh you know layoffs

9:38

and and try to become more valuable to the company that I need to be able to show my impact and you know have much

9:47

more uh influence on revenue and so I started to make a shift uh and pretty

9:54

much that day when I made that realization I said okay I need to go marketing route and I need to focus on

10:01

driving Revenue so here I am no job I’m building I’ve got a house being built um

10:08

I’ve got a kid on the way I’ve got a wife um who is just finishing school and

10:16

who is um she’s not working because she’s prepping for this baby so Soul

10:23

Provider and just like very stressful oh yeah super stressful I can’t imagine and

10:28

so uh I just went on this immediate like self-education this was back in the day

10:34

of linda.com which is now LinkedIn learning so Linda and I hung out a lot

10:40

um and I just you know read every book that I could find on marketing and I uh watched as you know all these different

10:46

courses and um just went to town on self-education in in marketing which in

10:53

there’s a lot of overlap in in that you learn in AD school and so I had some good foundation and it was a natural um

11:00

shift for me um but I don’t I don’t know how man but I’d somehow uh convinced

11:05

Fieldstone Holmes who was building my house I was talking with our sales agent um about their company and she was

11:12

telling me how they don’t really have a marketing program um they have people performing marketing functions but

11:18

they’re not marketers yeah and so I went in there um talked to the uh the

11:23

president of the company and and convinced him to you know hire me on to come be their Market Mar manager that’s

11:30

awesome zero marketing experience aside from like the the natural crossovers um

11:37

and then it really like it got real yeah um where all my like the marketing

11:44

lessons and and videos and stuff like it was all helpful but it was more like theoretical right um and so now it was

11:51

time uh put to the test to put it to the test can you give some insight into you

11:57

were doing video which video and creative what kind of video were you

12:02

making early on and then also um the ad School you were learning like paid ads

12:08

channels is that what you were learning um no it’s more of of just like um

12:13

complete end to end ad advertising yeah advertising uh ad campaigns uh kind of

12:20

the the ideation and execution of um you know like commercials radio scripts uh

12:27

videos that you know so on there there there wasn’t much uh

12:33

focus in the ad program there still isn’t this is not really the core competency yeah um because there’s like

12:38

marketing focus at at BYU or in school in college and there’s uh like

12:44

journalism and then there’s ad at scho advertising yeah um so it was just a you

12:50

know very focused effort on on advertising and for me it was much more on the creative side so um you had asked

12:57

what type of you know stuff I was working on so um and especially in my company um the content that at animotion

13:05

that we would create was um pretty much and this was also when YouTube was

13:10

really like starting yeah um so we were creating um YouTube videos uh videos for

13:17

you know websites marketing material um but uh yeah it was a lot of fun and was

13:24

really enjoying that I don’t know if I answered yeah no absolutely was it called the BYU ad lab when you were there yeah I was okay cuz then you moved

13:31

into this role with Fieldstone and when you were reading marketing books mostly

13:37

because a lot of the people who listen to this right there’s the generic terms of marketing and the generic terms of

13:43

advertising where we would talk about advertising as like hey it’s what we do

13:48

on paid ad channels because we run ads on Google and Facebook and YouTube and

13:54

places like that where then there’s marketing which is different from advertising and I know that that’s kind

13:59

of what you’re getting into I just wanted to maybe like separate those so that people could understand that um

14:05

they are very different and I would love to get more insight as you talk about Fieldstone of like what was the

14:11

difference between advertising and marketing uh once you got to Fieldstone and things got real yeah so I mean

14:19

coming out of of AD school and really what we focused on theirs is like

14:25

creating a creative brief taking um research and in information that we have

14:31

uh on your you know personas and customers and building out these creative campaigns and really what the

14:38

plan is going to be there wasn’t much um programmatic advertising um with any type of paid ads

14:46

that really wasn’t part of of what we did it was it was much more uh on the creative end uh writing scripts uh the

14:53

ideation for the campaigns really trying to make sure that we’re um you know getting to the the part of the consumer

15:00

um and a lot of this was for TV pre and pre-roll online yeah yeah okay

15:07

um yeah and and so coming into into Fieldstone I had very little of the

15:13

analytical side of marketing yeah you had a bunch of your theory down and a

15:18

lot of like execution down and stuff but and and creative side right but that

15:24

that one of that those realizations when the the kind of switch flipped in my head about me needing to move from the

15:31

creative side into to more marketing and and revenue Focus was that um and I’m

15:39

probably gonna take some heat from my ad friends but nice um when you think about who hires

15:48

advertisers right it’s the marketers right the marketing budget is what uh

15:54

dictates advertising yeah and so um you know I went to AD school but but pretty

16:01

much everyone coming out of AD school is at the mercy of the marketers right um they’re the ones all these uh ad

16:08

agencies that are being hired are being hired by marketers and and controlled by marketing budget and so to me that was

16:14

another thing that that I realized that hey if I want to kind of go a little bit higher up this chain um is you know I

16:22

need to be focusing more on the marketing side and so um started really

16:28

putting those theories and and principles to the test and uh

16:34

just getting my hands dirty into everything into search engine optimization into um building websites

16:41

and WordPress man like I I just went to town on WordPress um and PTSD yeah PTSD it’s

16:49

funny because I look back at it now and it’s those things where like you’re building out a site and you’re just

16:54

struggling with something and you find that one button in the subs skure place and it’s like that took me 4 hours to

17:02

figure out this one little thing that that took you know once you find the button when you know where it is it’s like seconds yeah oh so frustrating so

17:10

that’s the PTSD and then the boss walks over he’s like why’ that take you so long yeah like it’s like don’t you dare

17:17

ask me that question if you if you only knew um and I look back now I mean like

17:22

I can build websites now you know like super super fast um but yeah and then

17:29

into programmatic advertising and every aspect of of marketing email marketing

17:34

email marketing social and this is also when when social and Facebook businesses at this time were like should we be on

17:40

Facebook yeah it was like this was like what ear early 20110 yeah this would

17:45

have been uh uh 2012 yeah that was like the Heyday of like when Facebook started

17:52

to really pop off yeah um when you were at Fieldstone do you feel like you set

17:57

up a really clear plan for marketing like Hey we’re going to develop content this content’s going to be segregated

18:04

into email into uh advertising on Facebook we’re going to run programmatic

18:10

or do you feel like it was more like hey we also want to be pre-roll on YouTube

18:16

hey we also want to be on KSL hey we also want to be on uh Facebook and do we

18:22

do email marketing Peete can you help us with that like what was it like it was all of those things like everything

18:27

being placed on my shoulders which immediately it’s pretty overwhelming felt so overwhelming right because I’m

18:34

trying to convince them that I know what I’m doing yes and at the same time like

18:39

trying to convince myself that I’m like capable of this um well I get Field

18:45

Stone Fieldstone emails every week pretty much because I almost built a home with them so um maybe you started

18:52

that whole program maybe I mean there there really was no marketing and so one

18:57

of the things things and and I always do this any type time I go into any type of new industry uh working with a new

19:04

client new space is just research um so I went to town just trying to understand

19:11

what our biggest competitors were doing what were they doing to be successful uh interviewing people uh in the space uh

19:19

interviewing everyone in my company uh and just trying to figure out like how how can I really get started well with

19:25

well here and I got a lot of really bad advice um which I thought was like going

19:31

to be great advice design by committee equals chaos yeah and just people who

19:36

you know they everyone everyone’s got their own opinions everyone’s got their own opinions and and a lot of people think that they they can be good

19:42

marketers too yeah um and so some people were like oh it’s it’s SEO you got to focus on SEO here and some were like oh

19:50

like you should really jump into social and some were like oh it’s about Billboards and you know out of home and

19:57

and so I I created this plan put it all together and I look back at that plan and I just look and I’m just like that’s

20:03

cute that’s like definitely you got to post that plan on LinkedIn yeah yeah um

20:10

definitely in experience um you know looking back at it nevertheless uh I

20:16

think what made up for my lack in in in experience was just determination and

20:24

and hard work um putting in a lot of hours a lot of time

20:29

um and curiosity it seems like too you as a lot of willing to ask yeah yeah well I think it it I mean it definitely

20:35

shows I feel like you’re probably a marketer at heart especially with all of your like not a lot of people think to

20:42

just immediately go and like talk to every single person in their company and like do all of that research not a lot

20:48

of people make the choice to do that and it’s so important to to understand like

20:54

what’s going on and just more or less become that you know information center

21:01

almost and then and then with that then take that and make educated decisions

21:06

about what to do next yeah not a lot of people choose to do that you can’t be in marketing you have to observe the world

21:13

in order to understand it so that you can then go and Market to them right so if you’re bad at observing the world

21:20

you’re not going to be good at marketing so the curiosity is one of the best attributes of a good marketer CU you can

21:26

go and observe the world you were a customer of Field Stone so you could observe that whole process which in turn

21:33

was probably really helpful I would assume yeah yeah you know and and the question you had asked was how’ you find

21:40

your way to marketing it’s a long way to to get there that’s okay but and I said failure right and it really was like

21:47

failed to get into the film school you know and then felt like a major failure

21:53

when I was laid off um which pushed me into the marketing world and I’m like I

21:59

look back at those failures and I am just so grateful for those uh because I

22:06

um I found that marketing really has just been my jam and it’s been a really

22:12

natural good fit because while I had the creative side where there was a lot more focus in my early career um I really

22:20

enjoy and love the analytical um part of marketing and the and the data and the

22:25

science uh and so I I’m really landed where I feel like I I

22:30

should be and you know being a a religious person I I feel like it was a nudge in the in the right direction

22:37

where I think a lot of times we see our failures and and especially in the moment of failure man it’s so hard to

22:44

see um how yeah a way out and just like where it might be guiding you where it

22:50

might leading you um but I’m just so grateful for those failures and where

22:55

it’s brought me well I feel like it’s like it sometimes it does take the lowest of the low you know to be able to

23:03

change your perspective or whatever needs to happen and sometimes maybe like it’s I don’t feel like it’s ever

23:09

deserved to be at the lowest of the lows but I think it’s a place that if you

23:15

have the right attitude like you can do anything and get yourself out of that and you did you did just that and so a

23:22

after after Fieldstone where did you go next did you I know you have some history with ldsbc and sign College you

23:29

have some history with as angle point yeah and you know and and then parlay so like how tell us about that Journey yeah

23:37

I love that you ask if it’s angle point because uh a lot of our customers our

23:42

own customers would call us Angel Point interesting and I’ll I’ll talk about

23:48

that in a second but but it is angle point angle point yeah yeah no l e not e

23:54

l yeah yeah right it’s funny but it it that itself led to even though we kept

24:00

the name it led to a significant Rebrand interesting which was really successful

24:07

for us yeah that’s awesome um yeah so after after Fieldstone um I uh got into

24:15

agency world I was working with a agency called post primer um did that for a

24:21

minute and realized that um agency no offense to to you guys like work with

24:26

agenc taken yeah I promise no offense taken I’ve done like stuff off and on with

24:33

agencies for most of my career yeah um and there’s definitely

24:39

um like great opportunities there I also think that you have to have like a a

24:46

appetite for it um and a personality for it because it’s a different brand side

24:52

you get to focus hyperfocus and you get to be completely dedicated to one

24:57

specific brand and know everything about that brand intimately yeah when you’re in house customers the industry

25:03

everything when you’re in house um when your brand side um you have to kind of

25:09

divide um that Focus amongst multiple or when your agency side sorry excuse me

25:15

yeah when your agency side maybe we kind of that um when your agency side you you

25:21

kind of have to divide that to a certain degree uh or or at least um be

25:27

hyperfocused in uh kind of segments or or you know while you’re working on that particular

25:33

brand and some people are so good at that you guys are good at that I am not good at that um and I need to just like

25:42

focus in and get really deep on on a particular brand um so I decided to to

25:47

to kind of um move out of the agency space um a good friend of mine uh

25:53

invited me to to come work uh with him over at a company called om body uh

25:58

which is uh pretty it’s in the SAS space um specifically targeted uh in the the

26:06

towing industry of all of all Industries um and and some of those guys make a

26:12

killing off of their fees so oh man like we we could get into into some horror

26:19

stories I have what’s a worst business an agency or a towing or towing company

26:24

quot of the day um and then I found myself at anglepoint um and angleo I was

26:31

there for about six years and it was an incredible run I had so much fun and you

26:38

held a lot of different roles there yeah I’m all specific to to marketing but you

26:44

know climb the ladder yeah um but when I started I was it’s it’s I mean it’s easy to climb a ladder when there’s no one

26:50

above you um in in the sense qu of the day quot of the day uh in the sense that

26:55

um there were no other marketers at angle point I was the I was similar to um Fieldstone where I’m jumping in

27:03

and kind of Onan banned I’m the only marketer uh built out the marketing team um the first year we did $600,000 in in

27:12

marketing sourced Revenue uh and then after that by the time we left um we

27:19

were uh in the tens of millions wow um so it was a fantastic run um and really

27:27

help that that company scale and grow um but I was telling you you know people

27:34

Angel Point angle point um and that led to some um deep reflection about how to

27:43

build uh reputation how to build thought leadership um especially in a space in

27:49

which you’re not a thought leader yourself yeah um a lot of times marketers they’re required uh to build

27:56

brand and build rep reputation and thought leadership in a space that they are they’re not the pro in like they’re

28:01

not the expert in uh so it’s my opinion that sometimes the best approach is finding people who don’t come from a

28:09

specific industry uh but can have uh real journalistic capabilities and be

28:14

talented marketers because they don’t have any type of um maybe uh skewed or

28:22

have fresh eyes yeah fresh eyes fresh look at it um and that was definitely my

28:27

case uh when going into angle point it was in the world of software Asset Management which sounds so

28:36

boring it was like I’m glad you said that because I felt the same thing right

28:41

I learned like it was a really great offer and and and I wanted to take it I

28:46

felt like it was going to be a stepping stone job but man it sounded boring um

28:52

so Sam or and itam it Asset Management I didn’t even know this industry existed

28:58

yeah you’re like what the heck is this what is this thing um and so I had that task like how do I build a a the brand

29:06

here for a company whose customers are getting their name wrong and in an

29:13

industry that I don’t even know what the heck it is and probably super technical so Technical and and and there are a lot

29:20

of technical Industries where if in your marketing you’re saying things and

29:26

communic things even like the use of wrong words even like you could have a I don’t know

29:33

like a thousand page article and in that that thousand page thousand word p

29:41

article Harry Potter corporate attorney yeah serious

29:48

so you can have this you know thousand um word article and you can get three or

29:54

four words wrong and immedi turn yeah you can destroy the credibility of

30:00

that article and you know potentially of your your company and so you have to be really careful uh and one of the reasons

30:07

we didn’t Outsource the our content development our content creation SEO blogs whatever um and so really quickly

30:17

I found that I have to rely heavily on our subject matter experts ormes so your

30:24

your subject matter experts these are the people who are probably most apt for the the content development itself not

30:32

to say that they’re good writers not to say um that they’re you know good

30:38

storytellers but they have the expertise and they are the people um that you know

30:43

you need to extract the information out of them but they’re also the same people who have the least amount of time to

30:50

create the content yeah right so one they may be terrible writers and two they don’t have the time and so but they

30:55

know what they’re talking about absolutely then that’s where the journalism that’s

31:01

where marke is how do I take what their knowledge their expertise and extract it

31:08

and communicate it in a way that doesn’t make the company look bad uh but on the contrary builds you know thought

31:14

leadership and builds credibility and so that’s really the the

31:20

challenge that we had at anglepoint and uh we developed a kind of process and

31:27

and system uh to help us do that and it started working really really well um

31:35

and we were leveraging our subject matter experts and and uh building their

31:40

LinkedIn profiles and getting them opportunities to speak at conferences um and while while we’re

31:47

working on building our own credibility um from our own subject matter experts

31:53

in the content we were creating I knew that we were going to need to to scale

31:58

uh scale that in um you know size quantity but also speed we’re going to

32:04

need to speed this up yeah uh and so I started looking outside of our company to what other organizations in our space

32:12

what other companies have a lot of credibility um and trust that we can

32:18

leverage um to uh build our own audience and to BU build our own thought

32:23

leadership and I realized that one of those was Gartner um if you’re familiar with Gartner um they are for whatever

32:32

reason there are so many um executive level you know sea level leaders who who

32:39

pay so much attention to what Gartner is saying um almost religiously so that um

32:47

like they’re kind of the the end all Beall um what what they’re saying is is

32:52

like truth and so I wanted to Leverage what Gartner’s saying in order to you

32:58

know Drive uh attention and Trust to what we were doing so uh to to keep it

33:04

short we we kind of hatched a plan um on how we can um Market to the Gartner

33:14

analysts and get them to start sending us referrals so we’re coming from a

33:20

place where people are who’s Angel Point not the right name um to then uh a few

33:27

years later being named as the leader in the Gartner magic quadrant also if you’re familiar with Gartner’s magic

33:33

quadrants you’re not allowed to say leader um you have to say the highest and furthest to the right is like they

33:40

they’re technical like you get slammed on it if you if you say leader um anyway

33:46

it is Gartner’s pay to play yeah and nevertheless um uh you kind of have to

33:52

to figure out and and um learn how to play yeah um aside from you know just

34:00

paying um but we found a great way uh and I I wish we had time to like jump

34:06

deep into that because it’s to me it’s fascinating um but essentially uh we started seeing millions of dollars in in

34:14

referrals coming from Gartner and from the the Gartner magic quadrant being such a um a massive credibility boost uh

34:22

for to company probably made a lot of introductions that there’s no way you could have probably gotten them without

34:29

the association yeah I mean immediately being the leader uh in the magic

34:34

quadrant highest and to the right highest to the right uh it opens a lot of doors uh and now people um in our

34:41

industry it wasn’t uh who who’s Angel point it’s like you can’t not know who

34:47

angle point is yeah um in our particular space right so we’re we’re working with

34:52

some of the the largest companies in the world uh you know Fortune 500 and so uh

34:58

and it was just a a fantastic experience but while I was there um

35:04

I we’re trying to acquire on the marketing side or procure um not acquire

35:09

uh we’re trying to procure uh maretto this was before a adobe’s acquisition of

35:17

Marquett were trying to buy their software and it was uh for us it was going to be um I think it was around 50

35:24

grand um and it was all annual contracts only some money up front yeah and uh we

35:32

didn’t have the cash flow at that point to be able to make that purchase uh so I tried to negotiate monthly payments

35:40

which we could afford and they pretty much they said no that’s not it’s not going to happen how we do it uh yeah

35:46

it’s not it’s not how we do it it’s not how a lot of software companies do it right um I didn’t know that at the time

35:52

um we learned that we’ve even learned that where it’s like wait I can’t pay month yeah and you’re sitting here and

35:58

you’re like just take my money man it’s like why does it matter like if I’m paying monthly or paying anual um now

36:03

you know deep into what I’m doing a parlay like I get it I understand it um but at that time like I was frustrated

36:09

and they um because of that experience I couldn’t negotiate into monthly payments

36:15

I could barely even get into quarterly um but my CEO he was like hey sorry like that’s not going to fly we’re not going

36:20

to be able to do that all inone purchase uh so we got pushed into a competitor this was was with click Dimensions so in

36:26

Click Dimensions um it was uh it wasn’t

36:32

the best software we weren’t particularly excited to use it but it was the best alternative and so here we

36:39

have a situation where there’s money on the table from maretto and there’s a

36:44

customer who wants to pay but because of payment terms you know they get pushed out and then with over time uh at angle

36:52

point we grew our account with click Dimensions um but because we had spent

36:58

so much time and focus build you know building out click Dimensions into our automations and into our systems

37:04

processes and you know we were with them for years that it didn’t make sense down

37:09

the road when we could afford that annual contract to move like it was too painful and so when you look at the

37:15

customer lifetime value of what uh maretto walked away from like it’s

37:21

immense right it’s a lot of money um because of payment terms and now um I’m

37:28

having this experience at uh angleo and my brother Dan uh who is the the CEO of

37:34

of solo um it’s a a sales proposal tool for the solar industry um so Dan is

37:42

having the same experience with Domo uh and a uh a similar experience that I had

37:49

with qualtrix and so we got together and we’re talking about this this is a problem may we need maybe we need to fix

37:55

this problem so we start looking into it more and realize like this is happening everywhere yeah like the SAS World um

38:03

they there’s a lot of talk about sales enablement and buyer enablement but when it comes to payment terms it’s like all

38:09

right guys ready to pay and then they force you to pay their way right

38:15

whatever their terms are yeah and often times that can be you know near crippling for especially for growing

38:21

companies um and then what that does is that closes down a certain segment for for the SAS seller right where their

38:28

total addressable Market shrinks because of payment terms yeah and so we’re like hey like let’s let’s find a way to solve

38:36

this and to provide monthly payments to anyone who wants it to everybody right

38:41

and that’s our kind of our ethos and our belief at parlay and kind of where parlay began and kind of the origins is

38:49

let’s put the buying power back into the hands uh of the customer let’s give them

38:55

the choice to pay however the heck that they want for the software that they that they want to purchase and it it’s a

39:02

much better way to start a relationship with a software company when they say hey yeah you choose if you want to pay

39:08

monthly or pay annual it doesn’t matter to us um rather than saying oh like

39:14

sorry guys grand 50 Grand like oh like that’s that’s you got to do do it this

39:19

way or we’re not going to work together and so that’s that’s what we do right now at parlay is uh we’ve built a a a

39:28

process and an offering to allow the seller to maintain the annual contract

39:35

uh and for the buyer to get monthly payments and what we didn’t anticipate which I freaking love like I’m am like I

39:42

enjoy this part of our business so much is that uh growing companies especially

39:48

those who are more cash flow sensitive and don’t want to throw down 50 Grand on one piece of software which mind you

39:54

you’re going to have a ton of different software contra cont tracks and so if you’ve got um these significant renewals

40:00

every year um of you know large price um you have to really plan um your finances

40:08

well because when you you look at uh what those uh your software you know your Tech stack with the payments look

40:15

like you’re going to have like this massive payment and then you have nothing the next month and the next month then you got another one and so

40:20

like yeah just up and down you could stack two in one month and then all of a sudden you’ve got a payroll and y

40:26

everything hits the it’s heavy and so what we found is that a lot of these uh growing companies especially SAS sellers

40:33

or or software providers is that um they’re using us to uh kind of forward

40:40

flow or bring forward capital and kind of use us to um to get access to Money

40:47

in the Bank um who are they’re already offering monthly contracts um but then

40:53

they turn those over to us we pay them out annually and now um because they’ve got the money

40:59

you know in the bank up front um their buyer is now paying us monthly but they

41:04

have a lot more uh Power they’ve got operating you know Opex and so they can

41:10

grow faster and they can invest the you know those funds however you know they see fit to to grow faster without any

41:17

debt without delusion and it just helps them you know to grow faster so this was

41:23

started for family like you and your brother yeah um my brother was really the person who um like kind of made that

41:31

click and and realized like there’s a business here um and then uh I was still

41:38

working at angleo we had been talking about it and with that background in in

41:43

software um management the asset management um I had buil a lot of um

41:50

contacts and and experience in that space and so my brother’s pretty much

41:55

said hey like like I want you to come over and build this with me so cool and I at the time I was like ah man like I

42:02

can’t I can’t go right now because um I’ve got some really cool projects happening at angleo and I want to you

42:09

know make sure that my my team there is you know uh well taken care of before I leave um but he pretty much said hey

42:16

like I want to do this right now and so um he started the company and I jumped

42:22

in with him and um so since then uh it’s been about a year year now um that that

42:28

we’ve been working on parlay um and probably um 6 months or so out of

42:33

stealth if you will um and it’s been just a wild ride are you guys

42:39

bootstrapped or did you you’re all bootstrapped bootstrapped that is so cool bootstrapped family business really

42:46

that is solving a massive problem like from my perspective it looks like oh

42:52

you’ve got investors knocking on your door you guys are getting all this cash pumped into you but it’s really cool to

42:59

hear that you’ve done it bootstrapped and through family like that’s that’s really exciting yeah unfortunately Dan

43:05

Dan has some um contracts right now where he can’t uh actually work on

43:11

parlay full- time uh it’s just like in his personal time where he can work on it um but um it nevertheless it’s been

43:22

awesome working with him and the other um Founders that have have joined us as well that’s cool um but yeah we’re uh

43:30

we’re growing and there’s a lot of really exciting opportunities right now for parlay um but you know as sad as as

43:38

it is to say in the economy we find oursel right in right now uh and with

43:43

especially cash being king um nobody wants to freaking drop 50 Grand on my

43:49

contract right now so the the economy is actually it’s it’s helping us out yeah

43:54

um but we are like we’re a genuine win-win um there and and I find these to be hard kind of um somewhat rare and

44:02

hard to find is where um there’s a a true win-win uh situation so for for us

44:10

um we help the buyer get access to the software that they want uh with with you

44:15

know more flexible payments uh the seller gets access to customers that they typically wouldn’t get access to um

44:25

but the other end of the the SAS spectrum is you have these smaller companies or growing companies who get

44:31

more Capital up front uh and so they’re not having to go out and you know raise more money or or take on debt um because

44:39

we’re going directly to the buyer um and in the sense that uh the buyer is the

44:46

one who’s paying us rather than uh any debt being incurred from the seller yeah

44:52

so yeah you guys are solving a really a really really cool problem for sure how do you make sure that you have all this

44:58

Capital like stored so that you can send it back and forth you’re pretty much a bank right like how how does that work

45:06

yeah to a degree I mean we’ we’ve been doing that with our our own funds right now um we’re coming up uh with other

45:13

solutions to the point where as we scale and grow we’re going to need to you know get Beyond fining y um so um we’ve got a

45:23

couple options right now and we’re uh working on developing kind of determining what is going to be the best

45:29

route for us okay um but uh we won’t be you head that road when when you cross

45:34

it yeah but we’re not going to be the bank you know uh ourselves for too much longer and do you charge uh how does

45:41

parl make money yeah uh so there’s there’s a couple of ways um it’s always

45:46

coming from the buyer um we did some pretty significant research looking across you know thousands of different

45:54

um software companies and looking at what their average discount is or

46:00

premium depending on you how you look at it so most SAS companies who are offering monthly and annual they will

46:07

have a discount if you move from monthly to annual yeah and so across all of these SAS companies we found that the

46:14

average is between 18 to 22% we’ve seen as high as around

46:19

65% uh and is I mean of course low as zero um but the that that spectrum’s

46:26

pretty wide but the average 18 to 22% um so that uh we we kind of fall right in

46:34

the middle at 20% so if you right now um apollo.io for example um if you want to

46:42

use Apollo uh and you want and if you move from monthly to annual they’re going to give you a 20% discount um

46:48

clickup is a 40% discount uh and so with those discounts we we take that same uh

46:55

approach where if there’s an annual contract and you want to make it a monthly contract there’s going to be a

47:01

20% premium um so we we’ll take a 20% on that um and again that’s paid by the the

47:09

buyer um and so there’s no PO coming out of pocket for the seller right um now on

47:16

the other side of this with those companies that are already doing monthly in annually but want to have that that

47:22

monthly uh or that annual contract all up front um for themselves rather than you know

47:29

recognizing Revenue each month um so there’s a couple of of options they can

47:35

pass on cost to the buyer and you know increase the cost of the software which

47:41

that’s tough to do on the buyer um and so oftentimes the seller will say hey it

47:46

is more valuable for us to have this contract you know the value of this

47:52

annual contract all at once so so we’ll eat the costs you know we’ll discount our software um you know kind of eat

48:01

into the revenue so that we can have it now yeah um so sometimes they pass it on

48:07

uh sometimes uh they you know take it you know on on their own or sometimes they’ll do like a hybrid approach where

48:14

they’ll pass some on uh and uh eat some them themselves okay with parlay then

48:20

say we pay for like a monday.com they offer monthly but say they only offered annual 20 % off for annual um but we

48:29

can’t afford it so we go to Parlay parlay gives us a 20% premium we pay

48:34

monthly but then do you get the 20% off from monday.com by paying them in full

48:40

and make 20% both way so 40% is that something that you guys get no no so

48:46

let’s say that the contract is is $1,000 um with uh

48:52

monday.com um that would be the uh annual contract yeah um then there’s

49:01

the uh the r 20% so what you would be paying would be 1,200 you’re going to be

49:07

paying 1,200 for the year um the savings that’s coming from that that that 20% um

49:13

that’s uh that’s our earning um but we’re not taking it from um like Monday

49:21

is not giving us uh you know 20% on our side and then we’re charging to 20% it’s

49:27

it’s just the that yeah I was like that that’d be interesting because you

49:32

technically are paying the annual so you should get the annual price and then but

49:37

you’re oh so you are getting them the annual price of marketing up 20% now I get it yep perfect that makes sense yeah

49:45

um with I mentioned clickup right and clickup with a with a 40% savings uh

49:51

with us taking a 20% not only are you getting the the convenience of monthly

49:56

payments but you’re still getting a 20% discount on your software so it’s almost

50:01

like a financially irresponsible not to work with parlay if you’re a clickup user um that’s a great Point wow well we

50:10

need to evaluate we were literally just looking at our Tech stack we only do monthly Tech Stacks because

50:16

I I run our finances and I personally hate when I see like big expense months

50:21

because obviously when you’re looking at a potential exit one day you want to have clean expense sheet every month and

50:27

a clean uh net income so um but we get

50:32

offered to pay annual yeah uh on majority of our expensive softwares that

50:38

are 11 or $1,200 a month so yeah I’m interested to see how that would work yeah and oftentimes you can negotiate

50:45

with them and then you can say hey um I know that you’re offering like a 15%

50:51

discount if we move to annual uh we’ll do that if you move it to 20% and then

50:57

you come to us and then we pay it out right and then you pay us monthly but

51:03

then it just becomes a wash yeah right yeah um so it’s the same cost but now you get you know um you’re getting

51:10

monthly and anyway um and that’s particular particularly important for

51:17

situations where the software provider only only does annual yeah I think we do have a few that are larger than 20%

51:24

discounts for Ann though so we’ll have to look at them yeah yeah know for sure it’s definitely a an interesting thing

51:31

that we need to look at well when you look at at what we can do for the buyers is we can take the roller coaster um uh

51:39

kind of payment schedules and we can flatten it yeah make it clean predictable same cost every month yeah

51:46

which which is huge and I mean through everything that you’ve been through you you’ve done some additional like I know

51:55

You’ got paid for it I assume but it’s like almost at on the outside seems volunteer I mean working at enzy College

52:02

at the SPC as an adjunct not a lot of people decide to have a full-time job and teach at the same time and then

52:09

youve also you know you’re a lot of involvement with silicon slopes so like talk about that how does how does one go

52:16

about doing something like that and why did you choose to do it yeah thanks that’s a great great question um I’m not

52:23

teaching right now uh I mean I’m going to school yeah yeah um kind of on Hiatus

52:31

um I loved teaching um I really enjoyed it uh but for me it was kind of a way to

52:38

to give back kind of to to the world and to the the marketing uh industry

52:45

Community um my time it end College I really enjoyed it but

52:51

um adjunct professors and um who may hear this podcast um they know that

52:58

adjunct teaching doesn’t pay well yeah no so it wasn’t for the money because uh

53:04

to be honest the the opportunity cost and the time that it took you know to drive up to campus to to teach uh to

53:12

drive back and to grade papers and to spend time with students uh you know after class hours like it’s a lot uh and

53:20

so I did it for a few years and then um especially building a business and going to school just like it’s too much yeah

53:28

so there might be some more of that uh in the future for me um but I I just

53:34

love the the teaching experience I have a lot of fun um spending time with students and especially my favorite

53:41

people to teach are those who are curious and who who really have a

53:46

genuine uh desire to learn and to grow and develop uh my by far my favorite

53:52

people to teach yeah I I loved I mean I I personally I feel like I ow ldsbc and

53:58

zign college that’s where I really put me on the path to where I you know got

54:04

started and it was for professors like you that like took time out of their

54:09

insanely busy day to like come and teach and give students real life experience

54:15

very quickly um which you don’t get in a normal university where you’ve got a professor that maybe has actually worked

54:23

in that profession you know maybe 40 50 years ago exactly yeah and they’ve just

54:28

done Theory you know they’ve literally done Theory and haven’t practiced so I think it’s it’s a if you have the chance

54:36

to you know teach or if you have the chance to give back do it because you know you can influence people like you

54:42

wouldn’t believe how how because I one of the classes I taught was um uh web

54:49

management and we taught kids how to how to build websites from scratch and then how to build uh in WordPress I had I had

54:57

students who uh you know they’re 60 years old and they barely even know how

55:02

to work a computer teaching them how to build a website yeah um and at the beginning of

55:09

the class they’re like I’m not going to be able to do this like this is so hard and then at the end they’re like I can’t

55:15

believe I did that yeah and it’s super rewarding I’m sure so rewarding yeah so cool I when when were you at LBC andz

55:22

college now oh call I’d have to look at my LinkedIn

55:28

profile trying to remember it was probably three years three years ago maybe four years ago so it’s been a

55:34

minute yeah um but uh you had mentioned silicon slopes and uh one of the main

55:40

reasons I jumped into silicon slopes and kind of the story behind that was when I

55:46

was first getting into to marketing um in the Fieldstone times the

55:52

Fieldstone days um I I needed mentorship

55:57

needed guidance and there were some really cool marketing meetups happening

56:03

um it wasn’t silicon slopes um but it was you know a lot of the same people who were now involved yeah um kind of

56:11

the same Utah marketing Community who were really helpful to me um they spent

56:16

time with me mentored me and without any expectation uh of anything in return uh

56:23

and the time and and support uh and just the learning and education I

56:28

received from going to uh events and and you know lunch and learns um was so

56:34

valuable to me and so this was right near the tail end of covid um when

56:40

people started kind of coming back in I say the tail end like it’s completely over but um where people started

56:46

returning um back to work and to start doing events and things and um the the

56:54

marketing chapter uh was uh kind of stagnant wasn’t nothing was really happening so I

57:00

reached out to um to Garrett uh at silicon slopes um and I asked if I could

57:07

you know jump in and get involved and help you know kind of bring back and he

57:13

you know was really cool welcomed me in and and I you know started organizing

57:18

events at that time we were about 200 chapter members um which I’m pretty pumped you guys are the first one I’ve

57:24

told uh but we just crossed a thousand that’s awesome yeah I’m pretty pumped about

57:29

that but we’re now at uh our chapter is thousand 1004 marketers um and the

57:39

starting those events uh right near you know as people are coming back it was so

57:45

refreshing to be with people again and to be learning from each other again and

57:51

you could just see the hunger for it as people came in especially for that first event we did um but ever since um it’s

57:59

just uh another way for me now that I’m not teaching um it doesn’t take as much time

58:06

yeah um and so now you know it’s my way of of giving back and you know supporting kind of serving the community

58:13

uh and it’s a great way for me to meet new people and get connected and um so I really enjoy that aspect but um I I

58:21

think that there’s something really special and unique in Utah and with this sense of uh community and the Silicon

58:28

slopes uh World here in Utah and it’s um I think it’s unlike uh most other

58:36

business communities and and uh ecosystems throughout the world um it’s really cool to see how people just band

58:43

together and support each other and serve one another um and I’ve really enjoyed uh being able to see that and

58:50

help facilitate the connection uh helping people you know find jobs and

58:55

meet new people and find business partners and yeah so it’s been a lot of fun I’ve really enjoyed it yeah no

59:02

that’s awesome I think Utah definitely has a unique yeah there’s just something different here and whether it’s you know

59:09

attached to the the religious nature of how you know involved things get in Utah

59:15

or not like I I I do feel like there there’s a difference here versus you

59:21

know other places it’s a really competitive culture of like we want to all succeed and there’s also a really

59:29

strong sales culture here too that I think yeah helps companies Thrive but

59:35

silicon slopes has always been just incredible at what it does even though

59:41

you know you have Silicon Valley we’ve got the slopes yeah it’s way better here

59:46

yeah it’s funny I just got back from saster um one of the biggest events in the SAS industry and Utah had a huge

59:54

show oh I don’t doubt it it it was so cool because we all got together for a picture and you know kind of the I saw

1:00:01

that on LinkedIn yeah the uh the Silicon slopes does Silicon Valley

1:00:06

and so many different times at different booze different people I was talking to

1:00:12

um you’re also from Utah yeah they’re like and no joke this is the quote is

1:00:18

there are so many people here from Utah yeah and I just heard that from so many different people and I was like I love

1:00:25

that I’m proud like we’re doing our job we’re making a name for Innovative place

1:00:30

too right like I feel like people in Utah for some reason there’s something

1:00:36

that helps us all be more willing to take a little bit of risk and try

1:00:42

something I I maybe it comes from the fact that people feel like they’re born

1:00:47

with a lot of purpose you know and that purpose is what drives forward their

1:00:52

life so yeah when you feel like you’re born with a eight purpose then you’re going to work a lot harder to like

1:00:58

create more purpose in life yeah yeah and I just think the willing to to support one another to serve each other

1:01:04

oh absolutely um and you know it’s high here yeah it’s high and it’s it’s built into our culture and so you when you see

1:01:13

so much of that you know you had said that like we all kind of grow and win

1:01:18

together yeah yeah there’s not many places in the world where you get to network every week

1:01:25

with uh your 500 neighbors you know like Utah we all know the people around us we

1:01:31

all are able to go and support the people around us we get to know them on a personal level where in other places

1:01:37

you you might live in a CU ofac and know one person so there’s that Advantage too

1:01:43

yeah 100% yeah that shared shared Community Values are huge yeah no doubt

1:01:48

about it well P I think to to wrap up we we always like to ask like a couple of more or less like helpful questions and

1:01:56

you’ve you’ve had an amazing journey you’ve worked inhouse you’ve run your own business you’ve been an entrepreneur

1:02:02

you’ve been an entrepreneur right so like in your advice to someone who is

1:02:08

you know either wanting to get into marketing or wanting to just you know more or less hone their skills or learn

1:02:16

new skills what would be your your top advice for someone like that yeah especially those who are are trying to

1:02:21

break into to marketing regardless if you’re new uh say newly graduated coming out of

1:02:26

school or if you’re trying to Pivot in your career is to to kind of choose a a

1:02:33

route or specialty a a an expertise uh because most companies especially hiring

1:02:38

for entry level they they want someone to perform a specific task a specific

1:02:43

job right they’re not usually going to be hiring for and this does happen but

1:02:49

they’re not usually going to be hiring just for a generalist right they want somebody and especially if you want to

1:02:56

go into a larger company they’re going to want to hire someone um to do one

1:03:01

specific job right your email marketing your social marketing your you know video you know content creation whatever

1:03:06

it is like choose something that you can be the best at right just have like a real superpower and be really talented

1:03:14

at that thing and then as you grow that particular expertise then expand like

1:03:20

grow into the other areas of marketing if you’re really focused in on let’s say

1:03:25

copywriting and you know you’re a writer then start jumping into you know the the

1:03:30

creative side of you know video production or uh maybe look into search engine optimization you know SEO and

1:03:37

website building um and start becoming much more um versatile um and so so in

1:03:46

short like start um focused and then grow and expand to be more of a

1:03:53

generalist um I think that’s one of the key things that I recommend and suggest

1:03:59

to people trying to break into marketing or or to start is just to focus in hard

1:04:05

on a specific skill love that and where where can people find you if they want

1:04:10

to you know talk to Pete where are they goingon to find you yeah pickle ball quarts okay pickle ball quarts and

1:04:18

Alpine um yeah just LinkedIn is the best place to find me um you can

1:04:24

hit me in the in the DMs I I try to respond to everybody sometimes it’s a little bit slow um they add up LinkedIn

1:04:32

DMS man it’s true got a filter through thanks for respond thanks for responding to

1:04:39

mine um and then uh yeah last questions because we didn’t ever get into this is

1:04:45

soccer or pickle ball which one’s the better sport oh soccer for sure soccer yeah okay scared me I love pickle ball I

1:04:52

really enjoy it but to play yeah but uh soccer soccer will always be will be my

1:04:59

love and who’s your team the thing

1:05:06

is um now that mess is in the United States well so I’m a big fan of

1:05:11

Christian pich and he just moved to AC Milan um so I was on the Chelsea train

1:05:18

um and I know this is a little bandwagon but uh follow the player not

1:05:24

the player anyway so and he’s playing lights out yeah um but I was just in

1:05:30

Vegas uh watching Barcelona play AC Milan and man it was incredible that’s

1:05:36

awesome that’s so cool so you saw them play like a friendly yeah I was like they’re doing a US tour yeah yeah

1:05:43

Summers I was literally in London this summer and I’m like I’m here the one

1:05:49

month that Chelsea’s not here went everywhere else yeah so about

1:05:56

two years ago I was in London and uh went to watch a game I was there cheer

1:06:01

not actually cheering for Chelsea because I would have been murdered um it was at Watford okay yeah so you’re not

1:06:09

yeah it was Watford versus Chelsea silent fan a silent fan um but man it

1:06:14

was a lot it was a lot of fun that’s awesome well cool I’m glad you like the

1:06:19

real best sport on the planet um and it’s been great great having you on Pete

1:06:25

thank you for your insights reach out to him on LinkedIn if you’re looking uh for any marketing advice he’s been a teacher

1:06:32

works with silicon slopes and I’m sure Pete’s going to be more than willing to

1:06:37

respond to you as long as you’re nice as long as long as you’re not me happy help

1:06:42

however yeah thanks guys it’s been a lot of fun yeah thanks for coming on today Pete appreciate [Music]

1:06:51

it

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